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Grifter is an artist run space located in 2 Bridges, Manhattan, visit us at 75 East Broadway, unit 221, New York, NY, 10002 grifter.space@gmail.com

โ™ฆ๐Ÿ˜Ž แป–ฦคโ‚ฌฮท ฯ‰ั”๏ผฅะบโ’บฮฎฤ ฮ”า“ลค๏ฝ…ล˜เธ ๐• ๐”ฌ๏ฝŽโ“ข + ะฒสธ ฮฌโ“Ÿโ“Ÿ๐• ฦ—๐ง๐“ฃฯป๐”ข๐ง๏ผด เถ๐Ÿ˜บ

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! ALICIA GIBSON !

AอŸlอŸiอŸcอŸiอŸaอŸ GอŸiอŸbอŸsอŸoอŸnอŸ:อŸ BอŸaอŸcอŸkอŸrอŸoอŸnอŸyอŸmอŸ iอŸnอŸ aอŸ SอŸeอŸnอŸtอŸeอŸnอŸcอŸeอŸ
January/February, 2021

Grifter is pleased to announce Backronym in a Sentence, an exhibition of new work by Brooklyn based artist Alicia Gibson.

A symphony of poetic phrasing loops, hanging in the air, attached by color which is breathing. So much fluorescent transcends the imagery, a color sensation that challenges dimensionality. Shadows increase the weight of letters, outlines appear to be drawn around gravel, curved around natural splatter. A spill over words in a joking sense.

Witty nods to pop culture, pulp fiction, admiration, fantasy, pleasure, amusement, and fear.  A hierarchy of experience that starts with a very particular kind of everydayness. The artist is a woman, the artist is an American. The artist collects craft supplies and objects of questionable beauty, marketed towards the American girl, traces of the 90s and the 2000s.

Inside the paintings, tiny flowers have migrated from a country store to create a border around a note-to-self using crude language. The quality of materials is varied the way raspberry jam differs from sand castle. Tiny, trivial treasures like plastic gemstones, glitter, seashells, stickers and costume jewelry decorate lists of things to do, make sense of, and remember.

Alicia Gibson received her BA from Boston College, a Post-Bac from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, and an MFA from Hunter College.  Solo exhibitions include Friend from Foe at Loyal Gallery, Stockholm (2017), Backseat Bingo at Marvin Gardens, New York (2017), and Purgatory Emporium at CANADA, New York (2016). Group and two person shows include; Howard’s, Derek Eller Gallery, Lyles & King, Stems Gallery, Rachel Uffner Gallery, Adams and Ollman, and Venus Over Los Angeles. Her work has been reviewed in Frieze, The New York Times, MOMUS, Hyperallergic and Art News.

Alicia Gibson Knows What Youโ€™re Thinking (and Feeling, Too) By Dan Nadel

There are cool symbols and there are true symbols. Every now and then the two values converge, and we get, letโ€™s say, Nirvana. Alicia Gibsonโ€™s symbols, the stuff of her pictorial vocabulary, are not cool, but they are deeply, wonderfully, nauseously true. Unicorns, peace signs, โ€œOMG,โ€ butterflies, and glitterโ€”we think we put these aside when we grow up, along with our diaries, third base, and every other awkward part of our lives. We filter them into something elseโ€”we aestheticize and rename those feelings. World and identity creation take over, and evenโ€”or especiallyโ€”in the contemporary art multiverse, we pull back into acceptable taste. Then we adopt symbols that we can digest more easily, either because theyโ€™re already neutral and absorbed, or because theyโ€™re plain olโ€™ kitsch. Thatโ€™s the easy way out. Gibson, not one to do anything the easy way (thereโ€™s probably a painting with that title) doesnโ€™t give us that out. For her, as for all of us, we grow up, but the feelingsโ€”elation, hope, degradation, depression, happiness, blissโ€”remain forever. And if the feelings remain, why not reuse the vocabulary with which they were first expressed?

Call it the 1980s and โ€™90s notebook aesthetic. Or tie it to Lisa Frank, if you must. But Gibson is not a nostalgist. She deploys her iconography masterfully. Crucially, she is a painter invested in the physicality of paintโ€”in the melding of subject matter and materials. When we look at, say, Mel Bochner, the only other true painter/poet of our time (accept no substitutes) we get a chuckle from his mid-century-modern verbiage, but rarely ever think about the diamond-hard precision of his hand, his masterful attention to the chromatic potential of painting, and his vicious sense of humor. Gibsonโ€™s painterly cohort also includes trauma-maestro Sue Williams, greatest living heroic painter Katherine Bernhardt, and fearless identity explorer Robert Colescott. All are committed to both the religion of paint and the unmitigated truth.

And like all these painters, the loudness of Gibsonโ€™s symbols and colors can distract from the thousands of tiny decisions in each painting. โ€œPut It in Paintingโ€ is a painting- as-note-to-selfโ€”words, kindergarten buildings, big old drips, and spiral notebook paper arranged in harmony, as though natural companions. Incredibly, a painting called (and emblazoned with the words) โ€œCumface Killah,โ€ is actually a tender, beautiful picture. There are plumes of sky-blue pigment all underneath those words, and a delicate ribbon rings the bottom of the image. What a thingโ€”savagery and beauty all at once, doing the compositional push and pull. Other paintings, like โ€œDifficult 2 Deal,โ€ take a collage approach, using a flag-like arrangement of elements to contain Gibsonโ€™s inimitable, frenetic linework, and a deluge of phone numbers and notes that, honestly, we shouldnโ€™t read. Every now and then, however, a still life emerges from the paint space. So, โ€œSwarovski & Limoges IIโ€ and โ€œFuck Fragileโ€ remind us that this master of the poetry of emotional and psychological well-being lives here, among us, and can site and paint the real objects from which her symbols are abstracted. Those paintings are unexpectedly gratifying. They remind us that weโ€™re in the hands of a painter committed to her subject matter, spitting it to the stratosphere with a yelp, or bringing it to the ground with a caress.

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๐™ˆ๐˜ผ๐™๐™„ ๐™€๐˜ผ๐™Ž๐™๐™ˆ๐˜ผ๐™‰: ๐™„๐™ฃ๐™ฉ๐™š๐™ง๐™ฃ๐™š๐™ฉ ๐™Ž๐™๐™ค๐™ฅ๐™ฅ๐™ž๐™ฃ๐™œ in ๐™ฉ๐™๐™š ๐™๐™ž๐™ข๐™š ๐™ค๐™› ๐˜พ๐™ค๐™ซ๐™ž๐™™

โ„•๐• ๐•ง๐•–๐•ž๐•“๐•–๐•ฃ 13 – ๐”ป๐•–๐•”๐•–๐•ž๐•“๐•–๐•ฃ 26, ๐Ÿš๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿš๐Ÿ˜

Grifter is pleased to announce Internet Shopping in the Time of Covid, an exhibition of new work by Chicago based artist Mari Eastman.

In her first solo show in New York in many years, Eastman embraces the shopping mall context of Grifter, mixing consumerist attitudes with expressionist renditions of historical paintings.  Brushy thin layers give the appearance of soak stained paint and quick lines of image produce an overall textile effect. Working from images of beauty, Eastman paints a Matisse still life and a woman in a trench coat plucked from fashion photography. This allusion articulates how our gaze falls on a masterpiece no differently than if it fell on the pages of an airline magazine.

Eastman contemplates the supposedly reassuring qualities of painting. Her casual confidence is convincing due in part to great color instincts and an overall range of textures, from raw canvas to impasto. A professor of art, Eastman foregrounds materials and the sculptural qualities of painting. Academic discourse mixes with playful interrogation, creating a loving analysis of mainstream art and its frequent remoteness from reality.

Shopping mall aesthetics are extended by hand-painted sweatshirts featuring poetic phrases and imagery that hang alongside the paintings. Eastman suggests a mixup between the wily genius of shopping and the sincere emotional reaction we have come to expect when encountering great works of art.  The sweatshirts in their everydayness are a soft armor, suggesting an outward form of self-reflection.

Mari Eastman holds an MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago. She has exhibited at the Hammer Museum (Los Angeles), Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (Los Angeles), The Orange County Museum of Art (Newport Beach), the Berkeley Museum of Art (Berkeley, CA), Cherry and Martin Gallery (Los Angeles), Spruth and Magers (Munich), Barbara Gladstone Gallery (New York), and Maureen Paley (London) among other venues. Her work has been included in such publications as Modern Painters, The New York Times, and on the websites Artforum.com and Contemporary Art Daily. Her artwork has been featured on a limited edition collection with the Los Angeles-based designers, Rodarte.  Eastman lives and works in Chicago and is on the faculty of the School of The Art Institute Painting and Drawing Department.

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๐“‚€ ๐•ƒ๐•€๐•Š๐”ธ โ„‚๐•†๐”น๐”น๐”ผ ๐“‚€

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แ Aแ mแ aแ nแ dแ aแ  แ Bแ eแ rแ oแ zแ aแ  แ Fแ rแ iแ eแ dแ mแ aแ nแ ,แ 

แ fแ aแ lแ lแ  แ 2แ 0แ 2แ 0แ 

Amanda Friedman
Everyday Drawings and Pyramids


SETTING:
Exhibition on view at Grifter, 75 East Broadway, Unit 221, NY, NY
September 11 to October 31, 2020

Under the Manhattan Bridge within a grotto made of flattened paper pyramids and many marks.

CHARACTERS:
Everyday Drawings, standard
Everyday Drawings, subgroups = Calendar and Performance Proposal (Helen Rides 6)
Pyramid Painting, singular
Pyramid Paintings, plural, two-sided = Grotto
Mourning Doves, from The Fire Escape Cafรฉ
Blue Moths, slippage between systems, cosmos, times = Present
Several Solos
A Few Duets
Clay Castle Memory
New Planets, in this world

ACT 1:
Scene 1 — 9/11, Opening
Windows are walls. There are at least two see-through doors at this corner.

Scene 2 — 9/17, New Moon
New Planet/s Rising, Set intentions

Scene 3 — 10/1, Hunter Full Moon
Pyramids Fall, Fly, Overlap, Flip

Scene 4 — 10/16, New Moon
Many To No Days, Set intentions
Nights and days bleed together. Pyramids prop up days.

Scene 5 — 10/29, 10/30, 10/31 Blue Full Moon
Shapes and shapes, the moon and shapes, singing makes me feel better.
Shapes and shapes, the moon and shapes, singing makes me whole.

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โ˜บ๐Ÿ‘ฝ ๐“ทฯƒ๏ฝ’ฮฌ ๐“‡ฮฏ๐“–๐•˜๐ฌ โ˜†๐Ÿ˜ฒ

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๐ŸŒ ๐ŸŽ€ ๐‘€๐’ถ๐“€๐‘’ ๐‘€๐‘’ ๐Ÿ˜๐“ƒ๐‘’ ๐’ฒ๐’พ๐“‰๐’ฝ ๐ธ๐“‹๐‘’๐“‡๐“Ž๐“‰๐’ฝ๐’พ๐“ƒ๐‘” ๐ŸŽ€ ๐ŸŒ

<< march, april, may, june, july + august 2020 >>

Maija Peeples Bright, Hilary Pecis, David W. Cummings, Mira Dancy, Nora Jane Slade, Brianna Rose Brooks, June Culp, Mari Eastman, Josh Abelow, Kimia Ferdowsi Kline, Nora Riggs, Annette Wehrhahn, Clayton Schiff, Annelie McKenzie, Ryan Johnson, Heidi Jahnke, Brook Hsu, Sophie Larrimore, Keke Hunt, Alicia Gibson, Rachel Eulena Williams, Bella Foster, Caley Feeney, Jennifer Sullivan, Jake Manning, Alexandra Lakin, Alex Chaves, Marisa Takal, Howard Fonda, Al Freeman

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๏ผก๏ฝŒ๏ฝ‰๏ฝƒ๏ฝ‰๏ฝ ๏ผง๏ฝ‰๏ฝ‚๏ฝ“๏ฝ๏ฝŽ

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(ใฃโ—”โ—กโ—”)ใฃ โ™ฅ Heidi Jahnke โ™ฅ

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โ€ขยดยฏ`โ€ข. Bella Foster .โ€ขยดยฏ`โ€ข

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๐ŸŒท๐Ÿ  ๏ผฒรƒโ“’โ“—๐•–๐•ƒ ๐„แปฎโ„“โ‚ฌฮทโ“ โ“ฆฮน๐“๐“ไธจฮฑะผ๏ผณ โ™š๐Ÿ’˜

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Jฮ›Kฮฃ Mฮ›ะŸะŸIะŸG

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(-_-) Jennifer Sullivan (-_-)

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แ”•Oแ‘ญแ•ผIE แ’ชแ—ฉแ–‡แ–‡Iแ—ฐOแ–‡E

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๐’œ๐“ƒ๐“ƒ๐‘’๐“๐’พ๐‘’ ๐‘€๐’ธ๐’ฆ๐‘’๐“ƒ๐“๐’พ๐‘’

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๐ŸŽ€ ๐ป๐ŸŒธ๐“Œ๐’ถ๐“‡๐’น ๐น๐Ÿ’ฎ๐“ƒ๐’น๐’ถ: ๐ฟ๐’พ๐’ธ๐Ÿ˜๐“‡๐’พ๐’ธ๐‘’ ๐’ฉ๐Ÿต๐“‹๐‘’๐“‚๐’ท๐‘’๐“‡ + ๐’Ÿ๐‘’๐’ธ๐‘’๐“‚๐’ท๐‘’๐“‡, ๐Ÿคโ๐Ÿฃ๐Ÿซ ๐ŸŽ€ *

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๐ป๐‘’๐’พ๐’น๐’พ ๐’ฅ๐’ถ๐’ฝ๐“ƒ๐“€๐‘’ – ๐’ฎ๐‘’๐“…๐“‰๐‘’๐“‚๐’ท๐‘’๐“‡ + ๐’ช๐’ธ๐“‰๐‘œ๐’ท๐‘’๐“‡, ๐Ÿค๐Ÿข๐Ÿฃ๐Ÿซ

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๐Ÿณ โ‹† ๐Ÿฏ ๐ŸŽ€ ๐ธ๐’น๐‘”๐’ถ๐“‡ ๐ต๐“‡๐“Ž๐’ถ๐“ƒ: ๐’ซ๐’ถ๐“‡๐’ถ๐“ƒ๐Ÿ’™๐’พ๐’น ๐’ž๐Ÿ’™๐“Š๐“ƒ๐“‰๐‘’๐“‡๐“…โ€๐’พ๐“ƒ๐“‰ ๐ต๐“๐“Š๐‘’๐“ˆ – ๐’ฅ๐“Š๐“๐“Ž + ๐’œ๐“Š๐‘”๐“Š๐“ˆ๐“‰, ๐Ÿคโค๐Ÿฃ๐Ÿซ ๐ŸŽ€ ๐Ÿฏ โ‹† ๐Ÿณ

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